Tag Archives: WoGE

Where on Google Earth #496

With WOGE 495, Ole showed us some interesting mines, fjords, and a shear zone on Senja island in Norway.

Here is WOGE 496. It may be a bit challenging, but I think there are a few clues in there.
woge_496

Post the latitude, longitude, and a description of the geology/hydrology/other-relevant-ology in the comments. An archive of the past locations and some tips for searching are available here.

Good luck!

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Where on Google Earth #492

For WOGE #491, Ole showed us a Jurassic/Cretaceous endorheic basin in Argentina, where little water-erosion has taken place since the deposition of the tephra and lavas.

While the forests in WOGE #491 were petrified, the forests of WOGE #492 are still very much alive.
woge_492

Find this place on Google Earth, then post the latitude and longitude in the comments, along with a description of the geology, geography, or other interesting -ologies of the place. The first commenter to correctly identify the place will host the next WOGE (guest-hosting can be arranged). A list of previous WOGE selections is available here (kmz) and here (twitter).

Where on Google Earth #490

In WOGE 489, Ole took us to Ubundu, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, where the muddy Lualaba River is joined by two clearer tributaries and flows over the Boyoma Falls (previously Stanley Falls).

Here I present WOGE 490:
woge_490

Find this place on Google Earth, then post the latitude and longitude in the comments, along with a description of the geology, geography, or other interesting -ologies of the place. The first commenter to correctly identify the place will host the next WOGE (guest-hosting can be arranged). A list of previous WOGE selections is available here (kmz) and here (twitter).

Where On Google Earth #485

On the heels of a tough WOGE #482, Ole took us to Mistaken Point, Newfoundland, in WOGE #484 for a look at the extraordinary fossils found there—some of the oldest complex life known anywhere on the planet.

Here is WOGE 485. I think there should be enough clues in this one to make it fairly fast.
woge_485

Find the location of the image in Google Earth, and leave a comment with the latitude and longitude with a brief description of the geology/geography/hydrology of the area. The first person to identify it correctly will host the next WOGE (you can ask a regular to host it for you if you don’t have a blog for it).

Where on Google Earth #483

For WOGE 482, Ole took us to the Taklimakan Desert, to the dunes and playas at the foot of the world’s largest alluvial fan.

This WOGE has some subtleties, though perhaps they are not as subtle as I might think.
woge_483

To win, find the location in Google Earth, and leave a comment on this post with the latitude and longitude of the location, as well as a description of the geologic/geographic/hydrologic features. If you win, you get to host the next WOGE, either on your blog or with the assistance of one of the regulars (I’d be happy to help). Previous WOGEs are compiled by Felix here (or as kmz).

ETA: The above picture is a little tilted, as Ole pointed out in the comments. Here is one that is not tilted.
woge_483b

Where on Google Earth #474

For WOGE #473, we had a trip to the Diamantina River in western Queensland, Australia.

This being the first time I have hosted a WoGE, a short rules explanation:
A Google Earth image is posted with no coordinates. You find the spot in Google Earth, then post the lat/long in the comments here, along with a brief description of the geology of the area. Upon winning, it is your responsibility to host the next WoGE on your blog (or ask another player, e.g. me, to host for you), within a few days. More complete rules here, and hints on finding places here.

Without further ado, I present WoGE #474.

WOGE_474

I will invoke the Schott rule: previous winners must wait 1 hour for each previous win. Published 2048 UTC Feb. 24

@Wogelix maintains a Twitter feed of links to the latest WoGE.

I am on Twitter, too: @i_rockhopper.