Tag Archives: Rocks

Big Ben Gigapan

Processing the Big Ben gigapan.  Screenshot by Bill Mitchell.
Processing the Big Ben gigapan. Screenshot by Bill Mitchell.

This post is the first in a series of three on the gigapans I took on Heard Island. (Part 2, Part 3)

My first gigapan on Heard Island, this one of Big Ben, came unexpectedly. As I was out hiking one afternoon, my hiking partner, Arliss, noticed that we had a clear view of the summit of Big Ben. Clearings like this can be relatively short and infrequent, so we took a few pictures immediately. We headed back to base camp just east of Atlas Cove, arriving under an hour before sunset. The mountain was still visible, so I moved quickly to set everything up and get the gigapan taken before the light faded.

From camp, Big Ben is situated to the southeast, rising up beyond the flat sandy plain of the nullarbor. In this view, the moraines and glaciers begin about 2 km from the camera. To the right of the image is the eastern slope of Mt. Drygalski. The edge of the Azorella Peninsula lava flow is in the bottom left corner.

Glacial features dominate the landscape, including a prominent moraine now covered in vegetation (lower right). Coming toward the camera are the Schmidt and Baudissin glaciers. I think this view covers from the Allison and Vahsel glaciers (at right) to the Ealey glacier (at left).

On the Nullarbor, there are a few king penguins and elephant seals, primarily to the left of center.

Big Ben itself has a range of rock types, including basanites, alkali basalts, and trachybasalts, overlying limestones and volcanic/glacial deposits.[1-4]

[1] Quilty, P. G.; Wheller, G. (2000) Heard Island and The McDonald Islands: a Window into the Kerguelen Plateau. Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania. 133 (2), 1–12.

[2] Barling, J.; Goldstein, S. L. (1990) Extreme isotopic variations in Heard Island lavas and the nature of mantle reservoirs. Nature 348:59–62, doi 10.1038/348059a0.

[3] Barling, J.; Goldstein, S. L.; Nicholls, I. A. (1994) Geochemistry of Heard Island (Southern Indian Ocean): Characterization of an Enriched Mantle Component and Implications for Enrichment of the Sub-Indian Ocean Mantle. Journal of Petrology 35:1017–1053, doi 10.1093/petrology/35.4.1017.

[4] Stephenson, J.; Barling, J.; Wheller, G.; Clarke, I. “The geology and volcanic geomorphology of Heard Island”, in Heard Island: Southern Ocean Sentinel (Eds K. Green and E. Woehler) Surrey Beatey & Sons, 2006, p. 10–27.

Advertisements

Various Interesting Articles

Thin section photomicrograph of a gabbro, (crossed polarizing filters).  Image credit: Siim Sepp (CC-BY-SA).
Thin section photomicrograph of a gabbro, (crossed polarizing filters). Image credit: Siim Sepp (CC-BY-SA).

There have been a couple of interesting articles I’ve come across recently, which are worth mentioning.

First, Emily Lakdawalla has an excellent summary of the Pluto discoveries from both the American Geophysical Union’s Fall Meeting and the [NASA] Division of Planetary Science meeting. There’s a lot of new stuff there, and it’s pretty exciting.

Second, the Joides Resolution blog (the Joides Resolution is an ocean sediment coring vessel) has a series of posts (1, 2, 3) on geologic thin sections. Not surprisingly, the thin sections pictured are from rocks such as gabbros or sheeted dikes, which are expected in oceanic crust and in ophiolites (oceanic crust exposed on land). There’s a great exposure of the Coast Range Ophiolite just west of Patterson, CA, in Del Puerto Canyon, which is described in a recent blog post by Garry Hayes.

Third, Dave Petley has a great post on The Landslide Blog about the recent landslide in Shenzhen, China. I find landslides fascinating, and always learn something when I read The Landslide Blog.

Geoscientist’s Toolkit: Paleomagnetic Coring

Recording rock core orientation for paleomagnetic analysis.  Image credit: Bill Mitchell.
Recording rock core orientation for paleomagnetic analysis. Image credit: Bill Mitchell.

I’ve touched on paleomagnetism a little bit before, both as a technique for tying rocks in to the geologic timescale, and as something which can be found by using a fluxgate magnetometer. It’s a pretty interesting set of techniques and uses some cool science tools, so I thought I’d explain a little bit more.

Magnetism from the Earth’s magnetic field can be retained by individual layers of rocks, at least under some circumstances. If you have a bunch of layers stacked on top of each other like pancakes, the different layers (beds) can have different magnetic directions.

Stack of banana-walnut pancakes.  Although probably low on magnetic minerals and too thin individually for magnetic coring, they do illustrate the concept of layering quite nicely.  Image credit: Jack and Jason's Pancakes (CC-BY-SA).
Stack of banana-walnut pancakes. Although probably low on magnetic minerals and too thin individually for magnetic coring, they do illustrate the concept of layering quite nicely. Image credit: Jack and Jason’s Pancakes (CC-BY-SA).

As you might expect, the equipment needed to make sensitive measurements of the magnetic field are not particularly portable (and may be a topic for another post). Samples need to be collected in the field and brought back to the lab, and the sample orientation must be marked and recorded in such a way that the measured magnetic field can be related back to the magnetic field in the rock itself.*

To do that, paleomagnetists (or paleomagicians) will drill a small (1″ diameter by a few inches long) annular hole into the rock, leaving a plug of rock in the center. That will become the sample. Before it can be removed from the hole, a mark is made on the top of the plug with a brass rod. The direction of the hole is determined with a compass (or a sun compass when conditions allow), as is the angle away from vertical of the core (the hade).

When the plug is freed from the rock, the down-hole direction is marked with arrows along the mark using a permanent marker. The samples (several from each bed) are then placed into sample bags, labelled appropriately, and carefully transported back to the lab.

Are you irresistibly attracted to such a magnetic field of study? This is probably the best place to go for more information, and is freely accessible online.[1]

***
[1] Tauxe, L., Banerjee, S.K., Butler, R.F. and van der Voo R, Essentials of Paleomagnetism, 3rd Web Edition, 2014. [accessed Aug. 27, 2015]

* The field magnetic field?

Geoscientist’s Toolkit: Lasers

Neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser, open to show internals.  Image credit: Kkmurray (CC-BY).
Neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser, open to show internals. Image credit: Kkmurray (CC-BY).

Lasers are a fairly charismatic tool for scientists to use—using a laser is an obvious sign that science is happening in some way shape or form, especially if the laser has many hazard warnings on and around it.

Their applications, even within geoscience, are quite varied. They put the “Li” in “LiDAR.” Lasers are also used to turn very small portions of rocks into tiny dusty bits, in a process called laser ablation (the LA of LA-ICP-MS).

One tricky problem in geochemistry is that of analyzing rocks with a mass spectrometer. Mass spectrometers work only on ionized gases (or plasmas), and rocks are pretty solidly solids. In order to get them into a mass spectrometer, you need to break them down somehow, either through acid digestion or other dissolution method, or by vaporizing/blasting them with lasers.

Laser ablation works because lasers—particularly pulsed lasers—can emit a great deal of energy into a small volume very, very quickly. As I expect you know, rocks are not especially thermally conductive, so when they are heated up by all the laser energy coming in, it doesn’t have anywhere to go and the small volume of rock heats up and is broken into dust fragments and/or vaporized. By flowing a gas like helium or argon over the sample, this dust can be swept along into the plasma torch of an inductively-coupled-plasma mass spectrometer and analyzed.

Lasers used for ablation can be focused to very small spot sizes, from 2 μm to 1200 μm (=1.2 mm). These spot sizes are small enough that zones within a crystal, such as growth bands or inclusions, can be analyzed separately.

For atmospheric work, lasers can be used for spectroscopy, or at least probe the concentration of certain molecules (e.g. H2O, CO2). One of my favorite instruments (perhaps deserving its own Geoscientist’s Toolkit post) is the cavity ringdown spectrometer, where a laser illuminates a cavity with highly-reflective—but not completely reflective—mirrors containing a sample gas between them. A detector then measures the time it takes once the laser is shut off for the light to bleed out of the cavity (ms). From the ringdown time, the concentration of the gas of interest can be measured with high precision, even at very low concentrations. It’s pretty neat.

Really, there are a lot of geoscience things one can do with lasers: this is just a smattering of those uses of the tool.

Walking on Lava (Flows)

A cascade along the Split Rock River, in Split Rock State Park (Minnesota).  Cascade is 2-3 m tall, and the lava is cold enough to touch.  Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).
A cascade along the Split Rock River, in Split Rock State Park (Minnesota). Cascade is 2-3 m tall, and the lava is cold enough to touch. Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).

On a conference call some weeks ago, Nigel Jolly, captain of the RV Braveheart which will be taking the Heard Island expedition to Heard Island in March and April, 2016, told the expedition members that they will be expected to be in good physical shape for this expedition. Specifically, he reminded us that not only will we need to be able to walk around on the uneven and slippery ground, but that we will need to do so while carrying heavy things (potentially fragile and expensive, and generally needed for a successful expedition). In order to prepare ourselves, we are to get out and try walking around with heavy stuff on uneven ground.

Naturally, my first thought was that he just told me I needed to go backpacking on the north shore of Lake Superior. Don’t twist my arm too hard!

I called my cousin, who I figured would also probably need some arm-twisting to go backpacking on the North Shore, and we figured out the logistics. We even managed to reserve a hike-in campsite in Split Rock State Park that was right along the shore. Before we left, I checked through Roadside Geology of Minnesota to see if there were any special features besides the anorthosite (rock almost exclusively made of the mineral anorthite, which is a feldspar) which makes up Split Rock itself, and I put a few places on the quick stop list for the drive home.

The geology along the Split Rock River did not disappoint. Here were lava flows, more than a billion years old (1 Ga). Along the river channel, columnar jointing was often evident (see the far bank of the cascade and the far canyon wall above). Most of the lava flows were massive. The opposite canyon wall in the photograph shows columns 5–10 m tall, which would have formed in a single flow. That’s a lot of lava! While hiking along, I was on the lookout for ropey pahoehoe flow-tops, but did not find any that I recognized.

Lava flows found along the North Shore are generally part of the North Shore Volcanic Group, and have an age of roughly 1.1 Ga. They were formed as part of the Mid-Continent Rift system, and now dip gently (~20°) toward the lake. Many of the flows are basalts (low silica, high iron), although there are rhyolites (high silica, low iron) in the area (such as Iona’s Beach).

Mid-Continent Rift system.  Volcanic rocks are in the striped regions, while the dotted regions indicate sediments derived from those volcanic rocks.  Not all of these rocks are at the surface; much of the area in central and southern Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska, and Kansas are overlain by younger sediments (e.g. glacial till, Paleozoic carbonates).  Image source: Nicholson et al., via USGS.
Mid-Continent Rift system. Volcanic rocks are in the striped regions, while the dotted regions indicate sediments derived from those volcanic rocks. Not all of these rocks are at the surface; much of the area in central and southern Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska, and Kansas are overlain by younger sediments (e.g. glacial till, Paleozoic carbonates). Image source: Nicholson et al., via USGS.

It was fun to get to see some igneous rocks up close in outcrop (I live on a lot of glacial sediments, and the bedrock is Paleozoic sediments). The backpacking definitely demonstrated that more such activities are needed, because my legs were quite sore by the end of the hiking and the next few days. However, we did have a gorgeous view from the campsite! In the photo below, you can see the gentle dip of the lava flows toward the lake. Obviously, the weather we had on the North Shore (quite comfortable!) was much, much better than is expected for Heard Island. I had a great trip, and hope to head back up some time for more hiking adventures.

A clear morning on Lake Superior.  The lava flows making up the points further down the shore can be seen dipping gently toward the lake.  Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).
A clear morning on Lake Superior. The lava flows making up the points further down the shore can be seen dipping gently toward the lake. Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).

***
Nicholson, S.W., Cannon, W.F., and Schulz, K.J., 1992, Metallogeny of the midcontinent rift system of North America: Precambrian Research, 58 (1-4), p. 355-386. DOI: 10.1016/0301-9268(92)90125-8

Exploring Capitol Rock, MT

Wide-angle view of Capitol Rock, MT.  Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY)
Wide-angle view of Capitol Rock, MT. Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY)

Several weeks ago, I took a road trip with some friends across the northern part of South Dakota as part of a ham radio adventure. When we reached northwestern South Dakota, we were having so much fun that we decided to continue into just across the border into Montana.

At the state line between South Dakota and Montana, we found that there was a relatively high point (Capitol Rock) which we could probably access with our vehicle. Capitol Rock is in a national forest, so no permission would be needed to go there. It would be a good place to do ham radio (primary goal), and it would get me close to some rocks (bonus)!

As we drew closer to the summit of the hills, I couldn’t help but think that the rocks looked a lot like the ones in my research area in northeastern Montana, in the Hell Creek region (Hell Creek and Tullock/Fort Union Formations).[1]

Sadly, I didn’t get quite as close to the outcrops as I would have liked (we were on a bit of a schedule), but I did get some pictures and made a few observations.

North half of Capitol Rock.  Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).
North half of Capitol Rock. Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).

Here we had flat-lying sedimentary strata, presumably of roughly Cretaceous-Paleogene age (somewhere around 80-50 million years ago, Ma) (introduction to geologic time). These would have been shallow marine or terrestrial sediments from along the western interior seaway, which was on its way out at the end of the Cretaceous (66 Ma, [1]). I would expect to find some fossils preserved in the sediments, and from those, a fairly accurate date on the strata could be obtained. There may even be some volcanic ash deposits which would allow for direct dating using the U-Pb system or the K-Ar system (Ar/Ar dating) .

At the top of Capitol Rock were several massive units with a slight orange color (probably from oxidized iron). Beneath those were some more finely bedded strata, with bed thicknesses probably around 3-10 cm (eyeball estimation), and displaying some rough texture (popcorn texture?). Underneath those were some fairly easily eroded strata of generally uniform grey color. The image below has these observations annotated.

Northern portion of Capitol Rock, annotated.  Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY)
Northern portion of Capitol Rock, annotated. Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY)

The ground under my feet for that previous picture was still above average terrain. Here is an additional picture, taken from the south (looking north), which shows that the light-grey sediments are underlain by more yellow-orange units.

Distant photograph of the lower portion of stratigraphy underlying Capitol Rock.  Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).
Distant photograph of the lower portion of stratigraphy underlying Capitol Rock. Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).

Upon returning home, I decided to see what description I could find online of Capitol Rock’s geology. It seems there are a number of different descriptions of it.

Capitol Rock, located in the Long Pines Unit in Montana, is a massive white limestone uplift that resembles the Nation’s capitol building.
Montana Office of Tourism

Capitol Rock, located in the Long Pines land unit in Montana, is a massive white sandstone remnant which originated as a volcanic ash deposit. This unique formation resembles the Nation’s Capitol Building in Washington, DC.
US Forest Service

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has an interesting discussion of the geology of this area from the perspective of firefighting, specifically in the avoidance of fibrous or asbestos-like minerals which are present in some of the formations in the area:

Brule Member, White River Formation [ed: Formations are a larger stratigraphic unit, and can include multiple Members] – may only be present at Capitol Rock (SE 1/4 sec. 17; T3S; R.62 E) in the Montana portion of the Sioux District. Located at the base of the Arikaree Formation. Massive pinkish gray, calcium containing, clayey siltstone: nodular claystone: and channel sandstone. Contains abundant vertebrate fossils. Thickness 0-30 ft. The member is composed of massive pink clay, exposed in the badlands just Southeast of Reva Gap, well-bedded, hard pale green sandstones alternation with very pale brownish gray clay.
Weathering causes a tread and riser affect much like a staircase. Both the sandstone and the clay are generally calcareous and Bentonitic. The lower portion of the vertical cliffs in Slim Buttes is generally Brule.

Chadron Member, White River Formation – only located in the southern Long Pines within Montana. Found at the base of the Arikaree formation and beneath the Brule Formation at Capitol [R]ock (SE 1/4 sec. 17 T, 3 S., R. 62 E). Basal conglomerate sandstone overlain by beds 10 to 15 ft
thick of dark gray bentonite and cream colored siltstone. Thickness 0-100 ft.
Bureau of Land Management

Well, that’s a puzzling bunch of information, isn’t it! Various sources are suggesting limestone, sandstone from volcanic ash, and a mix of sandstone and siltstone. There’s one more source to check, too: the geologic map. Specifically, we’re interested in the Ekalaka 30’x60′ quadrangle from the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology!

In the geologic map (look along the right [eastern] edge, near the “T 19N” mark; Capitol Rock is ~1 km NE of the “Tar” label] we see the Fort Union Formation (informal Ekalaka member) at the base of the hills (i.e., under my feet), which is consistent with observations and the relatively detailed presentation from the BLM. It is also consistent with my experience that the Fort Union Formation is generally yellow-orange (in contrast to the drab, grey of the Hell Creek Formation). Then things get trickier. The rocks right at Capitol Rock are mapped as “Tar”, which is the Tertiary Arikaree Formation.

So, what is the Arikaree Formation? Well, the USGS has this to say:

Arikaree formation: gray sandstone with layers of concretions; contains volcanic ash and, locally, channels filled with conglomerate; known only in southeastern Montana.

On the other hand, the North Dakota Department of Mineral Resources breaks the Chadron, Brule, and Arikaree into distinct formations unto themselves.

I suspect this is all hitting at an important point: mapping is really hard, as is saying the rocks over here are the same as the rocks 40 km away. These difficulties are compounded when different scientists use different terminology, such as when the mapping is done by state geological surveys. The same rocks may change names when a state boundary is passed. Sometimes researchers will use the terminology from one state to apply to the rocks on both sides of the boundary, and then the literature is filled with multiple terminologies for the same rocks. It can also be very difficult to correlate rocks laterally over large distances, especially when there is poor outcrop over those distances (i.e. between buttes).

Here’s my interpretation of what’s going on at Capitol Rock: it is composed of siltstone, sandstone, and altered volcanic ash [still good for U-Pb dating!]. This volcanic ash is high in erionite, an asbestos-like mineral. Naming of the unit could include either the Arikaree Formation, or the Brule Member of the White River Formation. An age of 37–30 Ma seems reasonable.

***

[1] Renne, P. R., Deino, A. L., Hilgen, F. J., Kuiper, K. F., Mark, D. F., Mitchell, W. S., III, Morgan, L. E., Mundil, R., Smit, J. (2013) Time Scales of Critical Events Around the Cretaceous-Paleogene Boundary. Science 339: 684-687, doi: 10.1126/science.1230492.

Geoscientist’s Toolkit: Fluxgate Magnetometer

Fluxgate magnetometer; coil is around 1 cm in length.  Image credit: Zureks (CC-BY-SA).

The fluxgate magnetometer—not to be confused with the flux capacitor—is a nifty tool for determining the strength and direction of a magnetic field.

It works by using an alternating current to induce an alternating magnetic field in a magnetically permeable core (ferrite core), saturating the core. The magnetic field then induces a current in a secondary winding. My apologies for not having an open-use schematic, but the ones here and here are quite good, plus have a more nuanced explanation.

Absent an external field, the induced current will be equal to the driving current. However, in a magnetic field, one direction will saturate more easily and the other less easily, because the permeable core will be reacting to the external field. As a result, the secondary windings will have a current imbalance when compared to the driving winding, and the imbalance will show up both on the rise and fall of the driving waveform. The imbalance has a frequency of twice the drive frequency. Also, this design detects magnetization in one direction only. For a full 3D characterization of the direction of the magnetic field, it takes three magnetometers, each perpendicular to the others.

One of the early applications of fluxgate magnetometers was the detection of submarines (large metallic bodies). Indeed, through this type of study, the alternating magnetization of rocks along the sea floor of the Atlantic Ocean was discovered, with bands parallel to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. These data gave strong evidence in support of plate tectonics.

Magnetic field anomalies of the world.  Image credit: J.V. Korhonen,J. Derek Fairhead, M. Hamoudi, K. Hemant, V. Lesur, M. Mandea, S. Maus, M. Purucker, D. Ravat, T. Sazonova & E. Thébault, 2007, accessed via SDSU.
Magnetic field anomalies of the world. Image credit: J.V. Korhonen,J. Derek Fairhead, M. Hamoudi, K. Hemant, V. Lesur, M. Mandea, S. Maus, M. Purucker, D. Ravat, T. Sazonova & E. Thébault, 2007, accessed via SDSU.

But the magnetometer’s usefulness doesn’t stop there! Earth’s magnetic field extends out into space, where it interacts with magnetic fields from the solar wind. By measuring the magnetic fields, scientists can study the interactions between Earth’s magnetosphere and the solar wind, interactions which can give us auroras.

Aurora in Minnesota.  Image credit:  Charlie Stinchcomb (CC-BY)
Aurora in Minnesota. Image credit: Charlie Stinchcomb (CC-BY)

Perhaps an even more exciting application is the study of magnetic fields near the Moon. NASA’s ARTEMIS mission (using repurposed THEMIS spacecraft) is flying two magnetometers around the Moon. Heidi Fuqua, a scientist at UC Berkeley, and her collaborators are using the magnetic data gathered by the ARTEMIS satellites to study the Moon’s interior. Depending on the size and conductivity of the Moon’s interior, the magnetic field will have differing responses to the induced magnetic field from the solar wind. It’s pretty neat stuff!