AGU 2017, Day 4

Today was an exhausting day. This morning I presented my poster on the retreat of Stephenson Glacier, Heard Island, and was talking with people at my poster much of the four-hour session. It was very valuable to discuss my research, get input on some ideas, and to come up with a few new ideas for further work to do after this gets published. One thing which became quite apparent was the utility of social media in getting word out about my poster. Several people came by to see what I was doing as a fairly direct result of my engagement in social media, particularly on Twitter.

I also continued to come across people I knew from grad school or undergrad. While it’s a bit awkward to say hi to someone you can’t quite place in the different context, it’s fun to see them regardless.

After my presentation, I spent the afternoon wandering around the exhibit hall and, to a lesser extent, the rest of the poster hall. Day four of AGU often brings with it a combination of excitement for new ideas and projects with the exhaustion of having been walking around a lot.

At the end of the day, I headed over to catch a few planetary science talks. The first one, by Morgan Cable of JPL, was a very interesting presentation about lab-simulated dissolution and co-crystallization of organic compounds like might be found on Titan. Had my computer had batteries and if the wifi was likely to work, I probably would have live-tweeted that talk. It was one of the clearest talks I’ve seen this year. The second (and final) talk was by Sarah Horst. She introduced us to several ocean-bearing worlds that have organic compounds (Titan, Enceladus, and Europa), the extent of work that has been done to understand those organic compounds (surprisingly little), and reminded us that there are no current plans to go back to Titan or Enceladus. There is definitely some good data to be had there if we can get an appropriate mass spectrometer and other analytical equipment to the planetary bodies.

In the evening I joined other former and current students from my undergraduate institution for a mini-reunion, which was fun. Tomorrow is the last day, so I have also been trying to make sure I schedule times to see people before we all leave.

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