Nares Glacier to Mount Drygalski Panorama

Panorama from Nares Glacier (left) to Mt. Drygalski (right) from the Atlas Cove camp.  This view spans from ESE through SSW, and is roughly 85 megapixels at full size.  Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY, hosted on flickr).
Panorama from Nares Glacier (left) to Mt. Drygalski (right) from the Atlas Cove camp. This view spans from ESE through SSW, and is roughly 85 megapixels at full size (28 MB). Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY, hosted on flickr).

One year ago, I was on Heard Island. Over the course of the expedition I took more than 6000 photos. Although I took three images with the Gigapan (Big Ben, the Azorella Peninsula, and—my favorite—Windy City), I also took photos for stitching together manually using my own camera.

I have been slow in stitching these pictures together, but with the one-year anniversary of their production coming around, I decided it was time to finish one or two of them. This is the first, and I hope I’ll find time to finish more. Putting it together, I was amazed that this is still a relatively wide-angle compared to what I had available: 70 mm on a 70–200 mm lens. The detail came out well, as is evident at full-size. The glaciers, moraines, and hills are all more than a kilometer distant over the “nullarbor”, a broad, flat, volcanic-sand plain.

Toward the left half of the image are some penguins for scale. They look like king penguins, putting their height around 1 meter. I count at least 31 penguins in the entire image.

I think I spot some of the relatively rare basement limestones cropping out at the very left edge of the image, and their appearance is consistent with a dip of 25–35° to the south.[1] A closer view (200 mm focal length) shows them more clearly.

Location of limestone, with annotation.  Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).
Location of limestone, with annotation. Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).
Full-zoom on the limestone outcrop.  Bedding is clearly visible, dipping south.  Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).
Full-zoom on the limestone outcrop. Bedding is clearly visible, dipping south. Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).

[1] Quilty, P. G. & Wheller, G. 2000; Heard Island and The McDonald Islands: a Window into the Kerguelen Plateau. Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania. 133 (2), 1–12.

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Where on Google Earth #598

In WOGE 597, Stephanie showed us active sand dunes on the eastern shore of Lake Michigan.

Now we leave the glacial plains behind and head for the hills.

WOGE 598

Find the location, and leave a comment describing the important geology/hydrology/etc. of the scene. The person to leave the first correct location/comment gets to host the next WOGE.

Complete rules, hints, and a kmz file of previous locations can be found on Felix’s blog.

Where on Google Earth #597

In WOGE 596, we headed up the Nile River to the Aswan Dam.

Now, in a guest post, first-time winner Stephanie Januchowski-Hartley (@ConnectedWaters) takes us here:

Where On Google Earth 597

Find the location, and leave a comment describing the important geology/hydrology/etc. of the scene. The person to leave the first correct location/comment gets to host the next WOGE.

Complete rules, hints, and a kmz file of previous locations can be found on Felix’s blog.

Good hunting, and thanks, Stephanie, for the new image!

Where on Google Earth #596

In WOGE #595, Ole took us to Easter Island, figuring that it may take a while for it to be found! It would have taken me much longer to find had Felix not remarked about how it was a little early for that place!

Now for WOGE 596, we leave the volcanic cones behind.

Where on Google Earth #596

Find the location, and leave a comment describing the important geology/hydrology/etc. of the scene. The person to leave the first correct location/comment gets to host the next WOGE.

Good hunting!

Update: I neglected to mention that hints on searching, rules for hosting WOGE, and previous WOGE locations (.kmz) are available from Felix.