Pictures from the Field

Standing just outside the tents at Atlas Cove, Heard Island, on a clear evening.  Note that there is no incandescence from lava on Mawson Peak.  Image credit: Adam Brown.
Standing just outside the tents at Atlas Cove, Heard Island, on a clear evening. Note that there is no incandescence from lava on Mawson Peak. Image credit: Adam Brown.

A few days have gone by, and they have been busy! We’ve been fortunate in that when the weather has been poor, the radio propagation has been good. A fair bit of windy, drizzly weather has been present this week, and we have managed to make more than 50,000 contacts with stations all around the world.

Unfortunately, the weather has meant I haven’t had the opportunity to take more gigapans. I am prepared for wet weather, and this morning I went a few hundred meters across the lake which had formed in front of camp (ankle deep) to Wharf Point, the point inside Atlas Cove. There on the cobbles lining the beach I did a stationary count of the birds in the hummocks nearby, on the water, and along the beach. It took about 10 minutes, and I managed to get the list recorded in a weatherproof notebook for upload later. Getting out of the tent and away from things for a while was a welcome change.

Inside the operating tent are many tables with radio equipment.  We have six stations set up, two of which are outside the frame to the left.  The galley is just barely showing on the right, and I'm standing in the front door.  The sleeping tent is through a little hallway.  From left to right, by leftmost extent of the head, we have Adam, Dave Lloyd, Jim, Vadym, Ken, Arliss, and Hans-Peter.  Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY)
Inside the operating tent are many tables with radio equipment. We have six stations set up, two of which are outside the frame to the left. The galley is just barely showing on the right, and I’m standing in the front door. The sleeping tent is through a little hallway. From left to right, by leftmost extent of the head, we have Adam, Dave Lloyd, Jim, Vadym, Ken, Arliss, and Hans-Peter. Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).
The sleeping tent, which sleeps 14.  Although there are windows, they are kept shuttered all day.  It's a good place to sleep, but not particularly warm.  Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).
The sleeping tent, which sleeps 14. Although there are windows, they are kept shuttered all day. It’s a good place to sleep, but not particularly warm. Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).

One thing which has been abundantly clear on this expedition is that if you want to do something that depends on the weather, be prepared to do it. The weather can shift very rapidly (especially if it’s permissive weather), so “I’ll just wait until later” often won’t cut it. If you see Big Ben and want a photograph of it, get your camera and shoot. There may not be another chance. This evening I didn’t immediately take a picture when there was a clear, starry sky. I at least saw the starry sky, but did not get the photograph. With only a bit more than a week to go, I hope I can still get that picture.

In the afternoon a few days ago, the weather cleared enough to get a view of Mawson Peak atop Big Ben. I quickly grabbed the camera, put on the telephoto lens, and got a few pictures of the summit. Indeed, there was a small plume indicating (at minimum) hydrothermal activity or venting, but possibly a small active lava flow.

Mawson Peak with a small plume indicating volcanic activity.  Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).
Mawson Peak with a small plume indicating volcanic activity. Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).

Heard Island’s mood changes with the weather, and the effect that has on the landscape can be quite striking. The picture at the top of this post and the one immediately below are taken in pretty similar places looking in similar directions. What a difference the weather makes!

Antenna Lake, Atlas Cove, Heard Island.  Rain fell fast enough to flood much of the low-lying volcanic sand plain near our camp.  We were glad not to have camped there, and the antennas still worked.  It looks quite other-worldly, with the dark, broken lava flows and fog concealing the mountain.  Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).
Antenna Lake, Atlas Cove, Heard Island. Rain fell fast enough to flood much of the low-lying volcanic sand plain near our camp. We were glad not to have camped there, and the antennas still worked. It looks quite other-worldly, with the dark, broken lava flows and fog concealing the mountain. Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).
Camp seen on a rainy, dreary day typical of Heard Island.  Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).
Camp seen on a rainy, dreary day typical of Heard Island. Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).

Finally, the king penguins make tracks as they walk around on the wet sandy ground.

King penguin tracks in the sand of the nullarbor, Heard Island.  Each track is roughly 8 cm in length.  Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).
King penguin tracks in the sand of the nullarbor, Heard Island. Each track is roughly 8 cm in length. Image credit: Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).
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