Plan for Updates from the Field

Southeastern Heard Island in true color, February 20, 2016.  Image credit: data from NASA EO-1/ALI (public domain), processed by Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).
Southeastern Heard Island in true color, February 20, 2016. Image credit: data from NASA EO-1/ALI (public domain), processed by Bill Mitchell (CC-BY).

For what I hope are obvious reasons, during the Heard Island Expedition posting around here could get infrequent or disappear entirely. I will try to get updates in when I can. Here’s the general plan for when and where to expect updates:

  • VK0EK.org will be maintained by our mission control team, and will be the best source of information. It is reasonable to expect they will be in contact with us at least daily.
  • We have a GPS tracker, which you can follow here.
  • My blog here will be updated as I am able to do so. I’ve been told that internet connectivity aboard the ship is extremely limited (few text-only emails), so don’t expect much March 10–20 and April 10–21. However, on Heard Island (est. March 21 to April 10) the situation should improve because we can aim antennas at the geostationary satellites from stable ground rather than a pitching and rolling ship.
  • This post is going to be pinned to the top of the front page, so you will need to scroll down for updates.
  • I may post things to Twitter (@i_rockhopper), but I doubt it will see much use beyond linking back here.

Here are a few reading suggestions in case you’d like some additional Heard Island flavor while I’m gone:

  • Fourteen Men by Arthur Scholes. It’s an account of the 1947-1948 Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition to Heard Island, which established many of the scientific baselines from which changes are measured on the island. I enjoyed it, and it was available at my local (large city) library. The book is written for a general audience.
  • Heard Island: Southern Ocean Sentinel, Ken Green and Eric Woehler, eds. (2006). This book has the latest research on Heard Island. It is written for a scientific audience, and is effectively a collection of research papers or review articles. The print run was small, and your local library probably doesn’t have it. However, I ordered a copy from a bookstore in Australia, and I’ve found it an invaluable resource for preparing for this expedition.
  • Heard Island 1986-1987 Scientific Expedition Report, including significant geologic and Earth science research. Open Access
  • Heard Island 1987-1988 Scientific Expedition Report, including excellent hand-drawn maps raw population counts for several species of birds, and other great early-stage science! Open Access
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