Geoscientist’s Toolkit: Terra MODIS

Terra satellite being prepared for placement in the payload fairing.  Image credit: NASA (public domain).
Terra satellite being prepared for placement in the payload fairing. Image credit: NASA (public domain).

In my previous post on satellite communications, I discussed two types of satellites: geostationary and low-Earth-orbit. One of NASA’s low-Earth-orbit satellites, orbiting at an altitude of 705 km (438 mi), is Terra.

Launched in December of 1999, Terra is in a polar orbit, and is sun-synchronous—it makes its north-to-south pass on the daylight side of Earth, crossing the equator around 10:30 AM in the local time zone. As 10:30 AM moves around the Earth, so too does Terra, with each orbit taking 99 minutes.

Aboard Terra is one of my favorite instruments: the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MODIS. Unpacking the name, we find that MODIS has moderate resolution: its best resolution is about 250 m/pixel. It is an imaging instrument (i.e. it sends back pretty pictures), and it is a spectroradiometer, meaning that it measures the amount of light (radiometer) across a spectrum of wavelengths (visible and infrared, in this case). Most of my use of the instrument is for its true-color imagery, or “Bands 1-4-3” (corresponding to red, green and blue). An example image is shown below.

Minneapolis area seen by NASA's Terra satellite Sept. 30, 2015.  The Minneapolis and St. Paul airport is the concrete-colored smudge just left of center; St. Cloud is in the upper left, Winona toward the bottom right, and at furthest bottom right is La Crosse, WI.  Image credit: NASA (public domain).
Minneapolis area seen by NASA’s Terra satellite Sept. 30, 2015. The Minneapolis and St. Paul airport is the concrete-colored smudge just left of center; St. Cloud is in the upper left, Winona toward the bottom right, and at furthest bottom right is La Crosse, WI. Image credit: excerpt from NASA imagery (public domain).

MODIS is a push-broom type imager. It takes one very wide “picture” (2,330 km East-West), and splits that into 36 spectral bands. As the spacecraft flies (North-to-South), those wide “pictures” are put together along the track of the satellite to create a swath image. The instrument’s resolution is highest at the center of the image.

One great thing about MODIS is that it has pretty good spatial coverage (that’s the advantage of the moderate resolution). In 24 hours, it will get images of most of the Earth, but with a few gaps between swaths at the equator. Orbits are offset day-to-day (with a 16-day cycle), so it takes two days to get full global coverage. Global maps are produced daily (give or take) by NASA Earth Observations, and tend to have a day or two of lag behind real-time.

Terra MODIS image of Earth, Oct. 7, 2015.  The tan-grey streaks in the center of the swath over some equatorial regions is caused by glare from the sun reflecting off the ocean surface.  Image credit: NASA Earth Observations (public domain).
Terra MODIS image of Earth, Oct. 7, 2015. The tan-grey streaks in the center of the swath over some equatorial regions is caused by glare from the sun reflecting off the ocean surface. Image credit: NASA Earth Observations (public domain).

You may notice that in the picture of the whole world, Antarctica is nicely lit up, but the data for the North pole is missing? What’s up with that? Is NASA taking part in a conspiracy with Santa to hide his gift-production and distribution facilities?

In a word: no.

In more words, having recently passed the September equinox (autumnal equinox to folks in the northern hemisphere), the North pole is now in darkness at 10:30 AM “local time”. It doesn’t really matter what you choose as local time, because it’s dark regardless. With it being dark, the instrument is off.

Beyond pretty pictures, Terra MODIS is used for scientific purposes. Its images can detect wildfires,[1] be used to estimate area burned by fires, monitor drought severity and snow cover, study aerosols and atmospheric pollutants, and even chlorophyll (phytoplankton) concentrations in the ocean.

Using the images to understand the productivity of plants can in turn influence the estimates for how much carbon is being removed from the atmosphere, and can serve as a gauge of ecosystem health in remote areas. Volcanic eruptions, major wildfire events, and even thick pollution from human sources can be seen in these images. By analyzing MODIS data, scientists can gauge how much of various types of atmospheric gases are being emitted by wildfires.[2, 3]

***
[1] Near-real-time swath data are available from the Rapid Response website.

[2] Mebust, A. K., Russell, A. R., Hudman, R. C., Valin, L. C., and Cohen, R. C.: Characterization of wildfire NOx emissions using MODIS fire radiative power and OMI tropospheric NO2 columns, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 5839-5851, doi:10.5194/acp-11-5839-2011, 2011. [Open access]

[3] Mebust, A. K. and Cohen, R. C.: Space-based observations of fire NOx emission coefficients: a global biome-scale comparison, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 2509-2524, doi:10.5194/acp-14-2509-2014, 2014. [Open access]

Advertisements